Dudicus et Heroicus

Fuck It, Let's Dance!!
Ruby Friedman Orchestra

—You'll Never Leave Harlan Alive

(Source: bucktoothfairy1)

room42:

my husband was a motherfucking badass genius.  period. end of story.

{x}

*oh and that last frame is a scene built around an accident. Keaton tried to perform the daredevil leap, but he fell short, slipping off the second building and falling into a net. He was injured in the fall, but proceeded to use his mishap as the foundation for a new sequence with a complex series of secondary falls, through awnings, onto a drainpipe, through the window of a firehouse and down the fire pole. His genius made use of a dangerous mistake - turning it into an even better gag than if he’d actually made the jump.

(gifset courtesy…)

(Source: carry-on-my-otp)

tomwaitsvisualdictionary:

"My theory is that songs have to be anatomically correct. They need to have weather in them and the name of a town and usually something to eat — in case you get hungry."  - Tom Waits

tomwaitsvisualdictionary:

"My theory is that songs have to be anatomically correct. They need to have weather in them and the name of a town and usually something to eat — in case you get hungry."
- Tom Waits

(via rrrick)

americansongwriter:

Lyric of The Week: Robert Johnson, “Love In Vain”
If you’re looking for the songwriter and performer from the first half of the 20th century who had the most profound influence on the modern world of popular music, you can start with Robert Johnson and most likely end your search there. The longing, the pain, the notion that the world was always going to be one-up on you and singing about it was your only resort if not a consolation, all of those Johnson traits would survive intact into the rock and roll era, although his songs could cut even deeper than those of his musical descendants because of their unadulterated potency and unfiltered anguish.
When Johnson was singing about love, or the absence of it, the effect could be practically overwhelming even as his performance seemed so effortless. “Love In Vain” is one of his standards and the poetic truth of the title says so much. A quick trip through Johnson’s catalog reveals that time and again the search for love is nothing but a futile chase that leads to something somehow even more woeful than heartbreak.
“Love In Vain” is deceptively simple, just three verses. On the surface, the song is about a potential train trip that the narrator wishes to take with his woman only for her to leave him behind. But Johnson was ahead of his time in terms of his usage of metaphor. Since the train scenario was something his country blues audience well understood, he utilized it to plumb the depths of loneliness and desperation to which the narrator is reduced.
Click here to continue reading

americansongwriter:

Lyric of The Week: Robert Johnson, “Love In Vain”

If you’re looking for the songwriter and performer from the first half of the 20th century who had the most profound influence on the modern world of popular music, you can start with Robert Johnson and most likely end your search there. The longing, the pain, the notion that the world was always going to be one-up on you and singing about it was your only resort if not a consolation, all of those Johnson traits would survive intact into the rock and roll era, although his songs could cut even deeper than those of his musical descendants because of their unadulterated potency and unfiltered anguish.

When Johnson was singing about love, or the absence of it, the effect could be practically overwhelming even as his performance seemed so effortless. “Love In Vain” is one of his standards and the poetic truth of the title says so much. A quick trip through Johnson’s catalog reveals that time and again the search for love is nothing but a futile chase that leads to something somehow even more woeful than heartbreak.

“Love In Vain” is deceptively simple, just three verses. On the surface, the song is about a potential train trip that the narrator wishes to take with his woman only for her to leave him behind. But Johnson was ahead of his time in terms of his usage of metaphor. Since the train scenario was something his country blues audience well understood, he utilized it to plumb the depths of loneliness and desperation to which the narrator is reduced.

Click here to continue reading

(via dirtyriver)

essentialisinvisible:

A British soldier hiding from the rain under an overturned Tiger tank. Italy, 1944.

essentialisinvisible:

A British soldier hiding from the rain under an overturned Tiger tank. Italy, 1944.